Dawgs will be tested away from home next season

In a few months, Georgia will begin to explore life in the world of college basketball without the services of Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, who was recently selected 8th overall by the Detroit Pistons in this year’s NBA draft. Losing the SEC’s Player of the Year would be a detrimental blow to any team in the league’s roster; however, Coach Mark Fox’s Bulldogs will have to adapt and find additional scoring while navigating through a 2013-2014 schedule that contains a number of difficult games that will be played outside of Athens.

Just before Thanksgiving, the Dawgs will take part in the 2013 Charleston Classic, where they start off with an opening round game against the Davidson Wilcats – a team that reached the second round of last season’s NCAA tournament. Depending on the outcome of that game, UGA will play either Clemson or Temple – schools that both boast a strong basketball pedigree.

Some time in December (the exact date has yet to be determined), Georgia will venture to Boulder, CO to play another team that reached the second round of last year’s Big Dance – the Colorado Buffaloes. The Buffs return all five starters from last year’s team, earning them a preseason #11 ranking by Sports Illustrated.

In conference play, UGA will face Florida, Tennessee and Kentucky just once each, respectively. Unfortunately for Coach Fox, all three of those contests will be played on the opposing team’s court.

At this point, it’s hard to predict how this upcoming Georgia basketball team will perform without KCP on the court. More than likely, Fox will rely heavily on sophomores Charles Mann, Kenny Gaines and Brandon Morris to supplement the scoring load that Pope shouldered last season.

One thing is for sure though, this bunch will be tested regularly on the road.


9 thoughts on “Dawgs will be tested away from home next season

  1. Welcome back Hoop. I don’t know if he will score much, but my eyes bugged out when I saw that Marcus Thornton tied Juwan Parker for highest vertical jump (40 inches). This suggests that Marcus finally has good wheels and I’m hoping for drastic improvement in all phases of his game. One thing is certain at this point: Fox is pretty optimistic about this team. Let us all hope that this optimism is not misguided because with only one senior (Donte) and one scholarship to give this year, these guys had better learn to play.


      1. I think that the problem was that he didn’t have those kind of springs. I watched him carefully what little he played last year and the year before and he was moving like a guy with a painful knee injury. We will see what we will see, but I’m hoping for the best.


  2. Thanks for your posts Hoops. Always look forward to new ones. What, IYO, is the state of our program? I feel pretty good about the players we have in but after this latest recruiting snubfest, I can’t help but feel that recruits see our program as a “dead man walking” so to speak, and are avoiding us like the plague. Our incoming class for this year and the class for next year (so far) seem to really take a dip from our freshman class from last year. I really like Fox, but I’m afraid he’s going to have to have a season as good or better than last years-without our only star from last year-in order to stave off the axe.


    1. You are right about recruiting – this year’s freshman and the commits thus far for next year certainly aren’t turning many heads.

      I would say – other than KCP, of course – that Coach Fox’s program attracts recruits in the two- to three-star range.

      Most of the state’s top talent for this year have already committed during the early signing period, and not a one of them picked UGA (in fact, I just read that a kid signed with Missouri over UGA this morning).

      Fox has yet to land a dominant big man, and his inability to do so may ultimately lead to his unraveling at Georgia.

      It’s hard to envision this year’s team winning as many conference games as last year’s, considering the loss of Pope.


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